Ginkgo Biloba Tea Health Benefits And Side Effects

Ginkgo Biloba is one of the world’s oldest surviving tree species and has been used for thousands of years by traditional Chinese medicine practitioners as a healing herb to improve blood circulation. In the West, the tea is widely used to enhance memory and concentration.

ginkgo biloba leaf

What is Gingko Biloba?

Ginkgo Biloba is one of the oldest living tree species originated from China, and it is one of the most extensively researched herbs. The Ginkgo Biloba tree has green leaves that grow up to 3 inches long. During the fall season, the leaves usually turn chartreuse in color, although some leaves turn golden yellow in excellent growth conditions. The ginkgo biloba tree has stout twigs that appear gray, tan or light brown in color. The leaves of this tree are very popular in China for making herbal tea.

Gingko Biloba Benefits for Health

For thousands of years Ginkgo Biloba tea has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat a variety of disorders and support health. In TCM, Ginkgo Biloba tea is primarily used for treating dementia, memory loss and age-related cognitive decline. It can also be used to treat asthma and lung congestion. Most of Ginkgo Biloba’s benefits are due to its ability to increase blood flow in the body.
ginkgo biloba tea

Gingko Biloba Side Effects

Ginkgo biloba extract might cause side effects such as nausea, diarrhea, racing heart, headache and stomach upset. In addition, it might not be used together with other medication. In general, the side effects of ginkgo biloba are rare and mild. In theory though, it may also increase the risk of bleeding, particularly among people with certain medical conditions. Do not use ginkgo biloba if you have a bleeding condition, seizure disorder or any similar health condition. If you are a pregnant women, a nursing mothers, or someone taking medication with blood-thinning properties, avoid consuming Ginkgo Biloba.

Why Coffee Is A Silent Career Killer And Why You Should Switch To Tea

If you believe that coffee can improve your performance at work, it’s not. In fact, it’s actually a silent career killer. Learn why you should sip tea instead.

The Benefits Of Coffee Reviewed

Many coffee drinkers drink coffee in office because it improves performance, but is this true? According to a 2010 publication that summarizes a wide body of research articles on this topic and concludes that even though caffeine increases alertness, it usually does not improve performance of learning and memory related tasks.

coffee versus tea

The study also finds that low caffeine consumption reduces anxiety while a high dose actually increases anxiety. At last, there is mix scientific evidence on age related effects. Some studies find no age related effects while other studies actually find a decline in mental performance when older people consume coffee.

Even more recent, a new research by the Johns Hopkins Medical School shows that caffeine-related performance improvement is nonexistent without caffeine withdrawal. In other words, stop drinking caffeine actually reduces your cognitive performance and has a negative impact on your mood. So the only way to get back to normal performance is to drink coffee, and when you do consume it, you feel like it’s improving your performance significantly. In fact, caffeine is only taking your performance back to normal level  for a short period!

At last a known side effect is that caffeine makes it harder for you to fall asleep. However, what less people know is that the worst comes when you finally fall asleep: caffeine disrupts the quality of your sleep by reducing the rapid eye movement (REM) when your brain is recuperating and processing emotions. As caffeine disrupts this, you will wake up the next day with an emotional handicap. So what happens after is that you will naturally long for another cup of coffee and the vicious cycle continues…

See also the image below for some other side effects of coffee.

coffee side effects

Why You Should Switch To Tea

But don’t worry, tea is luckily offered at many workplaces around the world besides coffee. Here’s you should make the switch:

  1. Tea contains caffeine, but at a much lower dose, so you will not easily get an overdose. Here’s a tea caffeine guide if you want to know more.
  2. There are decaffeinated teas for those who are very sensitive to caffeine (even though it will still contain some caffeine). Besides, there are many herbal teas that are free of caffeine such as this calming Chrysanthemum tea and Rooibos tea.
  3. Tea does not only contain less caffeine but it is also distributed over a longer period of time, so result in mood swings. See the image below for further clarification.

coffee tea caffeine table distribution over time

Honeysuckle Tea & Pregnancy

Due to a recent publication regarding honeysuckle tea’s effect against flu, we have received many emails from customers asking us whether honeysuckle tea can be consumed during pregnancy. For this blog post we have consulted different Chinese medicine doctors to make sure we give a responsible answer.

What Chinese Medicine Doctors Say

Here’s a few answers we got:

Answer 1: Honeysuckle, can be consumed during pregnancy, but do not drink too much. Focus more  on drinking lots of water and avoid spicy food.

Answer 2: It depends on your health condition. In general, honeysuckle tea can be consumed during pregnancy. However, when it causes diarrhea you should stop immediately.

Answer 3: Avoid drinking honeysuckle tea in the early stages of pregnancy. Honeysuckle tea has a cooling effect on the body.

Answer 4: After the 3rd month of pregnancy, honeysuckle tea is safe to drink.

Answer 5: It’s safe to drink, but due to it’s cooling effect, I don’t recommend it as it will not have the health benefits that you are looking for during pregnancy.

Conclusions & Guideline Regarding Honeysuckle Tea & Pregnancy

As you can see from the answers above, they are all very different, but we can make the following conclusions based on this:

  1. Avoid drinking honeysuckle tea in the early stage of pregnancy (1-3months)
  2. If you decide to consume, then don’t drink too much. Limit to a cup a day.
  3. If it causes stomach issues, stop consumption directly.