Tea for Bad Breath

Have you ever heard from your spouse that you’ve a bad breath? Or do you know someone that has this problem? It’s always gonna be hard for anyone to tell another that he/she has a bad breath.

The fact is, that bad breath can seriously affect the intimacy between couples, and telling someone can sometimes hurt their pride. The good news is that tea can help! So what’s the best tea against bad breath? Before we discuss this, you need to first understand the root cause of bad breath.

What Causes Bad Breath?

There are several reasons:

The first simple reason is that one doesn’t properly or frequently enough brush and/or floss their teeth. As a result food might stay in the mouth, rot, and allow bacteria to grow, causing bad breath. This however, can easily be solved. Simply properly brush and floss everyday, and bad breath should be gone in about 2 weeks. But…

..often, however, bad breath can have some other non-dental causes that results in a more chronic problem. In the field of homeopathy (or alternative medicine) we call this ‘heat’ or ‘inflammation’. This is often the result of overworking, stress or some other specific causes, that results in certain parts of the body to be irritated. And this often causes symptoms such as bad breath and acne. Read further to discover what teas can fight it.

Green Tea for Bad Breath

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Green tea is often cited as a cure against bad breath. This is partly true. One benefit of drinking green tea is that it’s anti-bacterial. Because of this, it can instantly improve your breath after drinking.

Besides that, it can to some extend calm the body and reduce inflammation, though the effect is not very strong. Some herbal teas are known to be more effective against chronic bad breath issues, which we’ll discuss in the next section.

Herbal Tea for Bad Breath

Chrysanthemum teas

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Among all the herbal teas, Chrysanthemum teas are the lightest beverage against inflammation with a similar intensity as green tea. The benefit however is that you can also drink it at night, as it’s caffeine free.

Honeysuckle tea

Another type of flower tea that has proven to be effective is honeysuckle tea. This flower tea is very effective against inflammation. But because of that one should be careful with consuming this in high amount. Start with a cup per day. It’s a known fact however that one should avoid honeysuckle when you’re pregnant, breast-feeding as well as before and after surgery.

Kuding tea

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At last, there’s Kuding tea. Perhaps the strongest in fighting bad breath, but the downside is that it’s very bitter. Probably more bitter than anything you’ve tried before. Kuding leaves are often rolled and processed into needle shapes. Make sure to get the greener ones, as they tend to have a more pleasant and refreshing after taste.

As with Honeysuckle, Kuding should also be avoided by pregnant or breast feeding moms, and also before and after surgery.

8 Inspiring Ideas for Your Tea Business or Startup

Starting any business is hard, and you can’t get away from this challenging even if you’re in the booming tea business. Are you in the process of starting your own tea business now, or are you facing difficulties with your current business? Don’t give up yet. Read these inspirational quotes, even if you’ve failed many times, you’ll have the motivation to bounce right back:

  1. Start with a good product. It really doesn’t matter how good your marketing is, if you’re not offering unique teas and teaware that people will love, it’s not gonna work out in the long term.
  2. Think user experience. Is your online tea store easy to use? Do your customers know how to steep your tea, and do you offer the right teaware for that? How do customers experience your service and the interior design of your shop or tea room? Most expert believe that startups don’t invest enough in user experience. Does this apply to you as well?
  3. The last 10%: You’re 90% ready, then don’t be lazy on the last 10%. In fact, the last 10% often takes 90% of your time. Is it worth it? Hell yeah, it’s crucial, it makes professional and sustainable tea business different from the rest.
  4. A great tea business evolves: Making mistakes sucks, but not evaluating your mistakes and using the feedback from your customer to improve your business is a crime. Great tea stores learn from mistakes, and evolve by improving their product assortment and services, so they can avoid such failures in the future. In fact, if you’re not failing, probably you’re playing safe and probably you’re not trying hard enough. That’s risky. Even if you don’t have the best idea to begin with, you can likely adapt if you try your best.
  5. Motivation: Bad shit is always coming, it’s just something that comes with starting a tea business. Don’t get demoralized by that.
  6. Make everyone feel respected: If you’re working with team mates, make them feel respected, empowered, and genuinely excited about your mission. You can make a product that people want, but it’s as important to build a tea business that people want to work for. Hiring is also important here. Hire those who’re committed to the world of tea.
  7. Customer focus: always try your best to learn what customers ‘really’ want. They might ask for a mediocre tea bag, tell them about some better stuff you have and convince them to try! Really finding out what the customer wants isn’t always the same as what they think they want, or what you think they want.
  8. Be hungry: if you’re currently running a successful tea business, then you might feel safe. This can be a big pitfall. You’ve to be hungry, because being hungry is just half the work of sustaining a tea business.

Tea & Arthritis

Arthritis is a common terms that describes joint pain. While it’s often understood as a disease it can be rather seen as a symptom resulting from different causes.

For some people, arthritis could be caused by inflammation. In such a case, tea can be a easy and effective natural remedy.

What is Inflammation?

When visiting the Wikipedia page you’ll read that inflammation is described as:

A part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants, and is a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators.

Scientific research on mice until now concludes with pretty strong evidence that feeding mice with polyphenol rich tea reduces inflammation and thus joint pain. Does this work on humans? Well let’s believe it for now, until more conclusive research follows.

Before we head on to what tea is the most suitable, let’s have a look at the definition of tea as well.

What is Tea?

When we talk about tea, we’re referring to leaf tea made from the Camellia Sinensis tea plant. Given this, herbal teas made from other plants, such as Rooibos, doesn’t fall in this category. They’re officially referred to as tisanes. This of course doesn’t mean they don’t help against inflammation. In fact, some tisanes are very effective!

What’s the Best Leaf Tea against Inflammation and Arthritis?

Now you understand that inflammation is a cause of arthritis, we can now discuss some teas that can be effective against that.

When it comes to leaf tea, there’s green, white, black, oolong, and pu erh tea. They’re all from the same tea plant as I said before. What makes them different is the processing method applied. White and green tea are the least processed of all, while oolong, black and pu erh are more processed teas.

Types & potential side effects

Generally research shows that white and green tea contain the most polyphenols, so it would make sense to suggest those teas to prevent arthritis. However, white and green teas can have their side effects, and some people are very sensitive to that. Because they’re less processed teas, they tend to be ‘raw’. And this rawness can sometimes hurt the stomach. When you suffer from Arthritis, go for a cup of white and green tea first, but check if your stomach can handle the regular consumption of 4-5 cups a day. The best is to drink it after meals and snacks when you’re stomach isn’t empty.

If you do suffer from side effects on the stomach, then switch to oolong, black or pu erh tea. For the latter, there are two types: Sheng (raw) and Shou (ripe) pu erh. We won’t go into the details of explaining the difference here, but go for ripe pu erh.

Some oolong teas can still be harsh on the stomach, such as a lightly oxidized Tie Guan Yin, while a darker Dahongpao oolong is fine. Black teas are usually ok as well, and with ripe pu erh it can hardly go wrong. Ripe pu erhs are post-fermented and actually very soft on the stomach. It even supports digestion.

At the end of the day, there’s not that much difference between the polyphenol levels among the types. Don’t worry to much about the type of tea that you should consume as long as it’s tasty, so you’ll be able to make it part of your daily diet.

Herbal Teas against inflammation

Besides leaf teas there are also great herbal teas against inflammation. You’ve to be careful with those as they can be very powerful. So try them in small amounts first. In China, Kuding tea and Honeysuckle tea are the most famous examples and often prescribed by Chinese Medicine doctors.

Read this article in which we’ve published a honeysuckle tea with rose buds recipe: https://helloteacup.com/2016/05/13/rose-tea-recipes/

Other Notes on Arthritis

  • Avoid drinking tea in the evening as it contains caffeine.
  • Try to listen to your body, tea often helps, but not for everyone. Consult a doctor when in doubt.
  • Try to adjust your tea choice across seasons. Often times, people tend to go for a more refreshing green tea during summers and a more soothing black tea during Winters. There’s nothing wrong with that intuition.
  • Don’t just drink tea for health, try to enjoy it. Isn’t that also a health benefit in itself?!

 

Recipes: Enjoy Tea with Osmanthus Taste

Sweet osmanthus, also known as Osmanthus Fragrans, is a Chinese flower that’s often used in the Chinese kitchen to prepare desserts. The flowers are super fragrant and release a buttery sweet apricot scent. In this post we’re going to introduce you some classic blends with osmanthus that you should try out at home!

Before we move on to the recipes we would like to mention that there are also pre-blended osmanthus teas available, but they typically aren’t as great as when you buy leaf tea and osmanthus separately.

Osmanthus oolong tea

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Watch the video below to see how it’s prepared in a gaiwan and visit this page for more details.

Osmanthus green tea

Watch the video below to observe how it’s made in a glass teapot. See this page for more details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Ways To Brew Loose Leaf Green Tea in a Glass

Steeping a cup of green tea can be done in many different ways. Sometimes you want to take out your full tea ceremony set and perform a ritual, while there are also moments that you just want to steep casually using a straight glass.

Traditionally, loose leaf green tea is often prepared in a glass as they benefit from lower water temperatures. The delicate leaves are also hard to over-steep and can be kept in the glass while you sip. Isolation of heat is also a less important factor compared to preparing oolong or pu erh tea. Those types of tea would be better of in an Yixing teapot.

Don’t underestimate the potential of simple straight glass though. With some simple tips and tricks you can achieve almost the same quality as traditional teaware. In the video below we show you 3 ways of brewing green tea in a glass, followed by more detailed notes to tweak the brewing process based on characteristics of the green tea leaves and environmental temperature.

Rinsing the glass

Rinsing the glass with hot water before brewing can be beneficial to steep better tea. This will warm the glass, and thus keep the water temperature more consistent when performing your first brew. If you want to keep it casual, for example because you’re in office, then you could decide to skip this step.

Also read: Why tea breaks are good for you

Glass Brewing Method 1

The first way of brewing loose green tea in a glass is by first adding hot water before the leaves. This method is the most suitable for smaller tea leaves because they easily absorb water and release flavor, even when they’re added after the water.

Due to the smaller size of the leaves, they’re often more delicate, and thus benefit from the water temperature to cool slightly. When you add hot water at 85 C / 185 F it will decrease a few degrees by the time you add the leaves in.

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Glass Brewing Method 2

In the second method for brewing loose leaf green tea, you first fill up the glass until it’s 1/3 full, followed by adding the leaves. This is great for mid-sized leaves.

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In this last method, we first add the leaves followed by filling the glass with hot water. This method suits larger leaves the best, because they tend to absorb water slower then fine leaves. The brewing time would take too long when you apply the first method to brew larger leaves.

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Temperature, Duration & Amount of Leaves

For each method, you should apply a steeping duration of 3 minutes with hot water at  85 C / 185 F.

For green tea, applying a leaf-to-water ratio of 1:50 is a good starting point. This means that 4 grams of leaf is good for a 200 ml (6-7 oz) glass of tea that can be steeped for 3 times.

Subsequent Steeps

Once you’ve consumed 2/3 of the glass or whenever you feel that the taste is becoming to strong, simply refill it with hot water. A good quality green tea should get you at least 3 brews.

Seasonal Tweaks

While above we refer each way of steeping as a ‘method’ you could rather see them as variations in the way of brewing with a glass. Choosing a method to prepare loose leaf green tea based on the delicacy of the leaves is a great starting point. However, sometimes you need to consider the surrounding environment as well.

Let’s say you’re brewing a cup of tea outside during a hot summer day. Then the first method of adding hot water could already be great for tea leaves that you would normally steep with method 2. That’s because hot water tend to cool down more slowly in such condition. In contrast, you want to use method 3 (adding leaves before pouring hot water) more often when you’re in a low temperature environment. Questions? Please ask.

2 Chinese Dried Rose Tea Recipes: Low Calories & Lots of Benefits

Rose flower tea is delicious and has lots of benefits such as supporting your digestion, improving the skin, and helping you to de-stress after a busy working day. As it’s caffeine free and near zero in calories, it’s suitable for any time of the day. See the video below showing how you can easily prepare a rose flower tea at home/office with a Teasenz infusion tea mug. This video will be followed by two bonus rose tea recipe ideas!

Honeysuckle Rose Tea Recipe To Fight Flu

One amazing rose tea recipe is one that combines the dried roses with honeysuckle. A great recipe to enjoy the health benefits of roses with the anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties of Honeysuckle. And did you know it’s great as a natural remedy against a flu or cold as well?

What you’ll need:

  • 2 gram dried honeysuckle
  • 5 pieces rose buds
  • Water temperature: 90 degrees Celsius
  • Steeping time: 5-8 minutes
  • Water amount:
    • 120 ml hot water in gaiwan – good for 3 brews; or
    • 500 ml hot water in teapot – good for 1 brew.

Note: avoid honeysuckle during pregnancy.

Myosotis Rose Tea Recipe for Even Better Skin

One other popular Chinese rose tea recipe is one that combines dried rose buds with Myosotis flowers. These purple flowers are often used in cosmetics as they’re amazing for a soft and smooth skin. In addition, it adds a more nutty flavor to the pure rose tea. Try this recipe as soon as you can and stay young forever..

What you’ll need:

  • 2 gram Myosotis
  • 3-6 pieces of Rose buds
  • Water temperature: 90 degrees Celsius
  • Steeping time: 12 minutes
  • Water amount:
    • 120 ml hot water in gaiwan – good for 3 brews; or
    • 500 ml hot water in teapot – good for 1 brew.

Other Flowers: Lavender?

Now that you know that rose tea can be blended with Myosotis and Honeysuckle, you might wonder whether it works with other flowers as well. The answer is: yes, probably. One flower that’s for sure great with roses is lavender. The aroma of lavender is strong, so try to find a balance in proportion for the blend. We suggest to start wit about 80% roses and 20% lavender. If you’ve any other rose tea recipe ideas, feel free to share them in the comment section!

Add Leaf Tea: Rose Green Tea Recipe?

Adding leaf teas to the rose flowers definitely is another way to be creative. Because the aroma of roses is delicate, we suggest to experiment with green teas, as they’re lighter in flavor. Moreover, the green color of the fresh leaves will look amazing with red or pink roses.

Make Iced Rose Tea

Besides making hot teas as shown in the video above, you could serve the teas ice-cold.  Either put the hot teas in the fridge (after they reach room temperature) or add lots of ice to let it cool down instantly. Great to stay fresh and hydrated during hot summer days. And if you can, bring some to the beach.

Glass teaware deals! 10% OFF This Week

This deal is expired. For current sale items please visit: https://www.teasenz.com/sales

This week Teasenz is  offering 3 glass teaware products at 10% discount! See the glass teapots below:

250 ml: Small Glass Tea Cauldron/Teapot

Who says water cools down to fast in glass ware? This tea cauldron/teapot is made from extra thick and extra strong glass, making it possible to brew a quality cup of kungfu tea.

https://www.teasenz.com/small-glass-teapot-with-infuser-stainless-steel-250-ml

600 ml: Glass Teapot with Real Bamboo Handle

Great teapot to make tea for 2-4 tea enthousiasts. Filter in the sprout keeps the leaves inside the pot. And the bamboo handle, is nice to hold and and looks amazing.

https://www.teasenz.com/chinese-glass-teapot-with-bamboo-handle-600-ml

1200 ml: Large Glass Teapot with Real Bamboo Handle

This tea pot is huge. Conveniently make tea for 4-6 persons and serve in style. Comes with a removable stainless steel tea strainer and natural bamboo handle.

https://www.teasenz.com/large-teapot-with-infuser-bamboo-handle-teapot-1200-ml

Don’t wait any longer. This deal is valid until the 1st of May and as long as stock lasts!

Tea Pics: Picking & Processing Chinese Tea

Some nice images were shared by the China Daily newspaper recently to show how Chinese tea is made. We can write a lot about the complicated process about it, but that would be boring to read. Check the impressive pics below to get an idea of journey from the leaf that ends up in your cup. These tea pics are definitely worth a thousand words.

Picking tea

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Here’s a close up, smile!tea leaves close up

Air drying tea

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Pan Firing

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Finished dry leaves

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And Finally,…the green tea leaves end in a cup

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