All things Chinese tea, food and culture.

Recent Tea Posts

Make Your Own Lemongrass Tea

Make Your Own Lemongrass Tea

Want to try something different in your tea life? Maybe Lemongrass tea is the answer. It’s a light pale tea that can help you both with your inner serenity and with your health. For ages it has been used as medicine – to heal what […]

Spray Some Tea On It

Spray Some Tea On It

In the movie, My Big Fat Greek Wedding, the father character thought that everything from illness, to burns, to scrapes or huge wounds, could be healed with Windex. With all the tea can prevent and heal, from preventing Strokes, cancer prevention, to skin and hair […]

Make Your Own Bubble Tea

Make Your Own Bubble Tea

Who doesn’t love bubble tea? The sweet cool beverage is hard to pass up walking through the asian supermarket or bubble tea stalls. Well with this recipe, you can make it at home. This recipe details  how to make both the tea and “bubbles”, or Boba.

How to Make Boba and Bubble Tea

What You Need

Ingredients

1/4 cup dried boba tapioca pearls per serving (NOT quick-cooking boba)
1-2 tea bags per serving, any kind
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
Milk, almond milk, or sweetened condensed milk
Fruit juice or nectar (optional)

Equipment

Saucepan
Bowl for holding the cooked boba
Measuring cups

Instructions

1. Cook the Boba: Measure 2 cups of water for every 1/4 cup of boba being prepared into a saucepan. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Add the boba and stir gently until they begin floating to the top of the water.

Turn the heat to medium and cook the boba for 12-15 minutes. Remove the pan from heat, cover, and let the pearls sit for another 12-15 minutes.

2. Prepare Sugar Syrup for the Boba: While the boba are cooking, make a simple sugar syrup to sweeten and preserve them once cooked. Bring 1/2 cup of water to a boil over high heat on the stove or in the microwave. Remove from heat and stir in 1/2 cup sugar until dissolved. Set aside to cool.

3. Prepare a Strong Cup of Tea: This can be done either while the boba are cooking or ahead of time. Allow enough time for the tea to cool completely before making the boba. Bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Remove from heat and add the tea bag. Use one tea bag for regular-strength bubble tea or two for a stronger tea flavor. Remove the tea bag after 15 minutes and chill the tea.

4. Finish the Boba: Once the boba have finished cooking, drain them from the water and transfer them to a small bowl or container. Pour the sugar syrup over top until the boba are submerged. Let sit until the boba are room temperature, at least 15 minutes, or refrigerate until ready to use. Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

5. Make the Bubble Tea: Pour the prepared tea into a tall glass and add the boba. Add milk for a creamy bubble tea, juice for a fruity tea, or leave plain and add a little extra water. Sweeten to taste with the simple syrup from soaking the boba.

Additional Notes:

• Very Chilled Bubble Tea: For an extra-chilly bubble tea, combine all the tea, milk, and/or juice, but not the boba in a cocktail shaker. Add a few ice cubes and shake for 20 seconds. Pour into a tall glass and add the boba.

• Shortcut Boba: If you want immediate gratification, just cook your boba until they are tender, 5 to 10 minutes, and use them as soon as they’re cool. This kind of boba don’t keep for very long (turning rock hard in a few hours), but are delicious if eaten right away.

• Saving Leftover Boba and Making Boba for Later: Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated with simple syrup for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

Dunking Cookies In Tea – Now Backed Up By Science

Dunking Cookies In Tea – Now Backed Up By Science

I think we can admit to ourselves that we’re dunkers. It may not be polite, it may be messy – but it is delicious. Dipping the cookie in, just enough to make it warm and awesome, but not so much that it crumbles away – […]

It’s Tea Time – Woof! Woof!

It’s Tea Time – Woof! Woof!

It is not an uncommon thing to take tea with your pets. Curling up with a cup of tea, a good book, and you cat purring beside you, having your breakfast feeding your dog biscuits under the table, drinking tea with your bird on your […]

Making Chinese Marbled Tea Eggs

Making Chinese Marbled Tea Eggs

For those of you out there giving up things for Lent – at the very least Easter is on the mind. That day you can finally drink soda or eat cake again, or even just the Holiday. With rabbits and peeps and most importantly, awesomely dyed eggs.  Being of the Christian persuasion or not the Chinese Marbled Tea Egg is something to try. Just looking at pictures of it – you don’t think it’s a hard boiled egg but actually a work of art.

They are actually beautiful and whatever the occasion – using tea to make art, even if you’re going to eat it, is a worthy cause. This is a recipe via Steamy Kitchen for these masterpieces:

What You’ll Need:

6 eggs
3/4 cup soy sauce
2 star anise
2 tablespoons black tea (or 2 tea bags)
1 cinnamon stick
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon Sichuan peppercorn (optional)
2 strips dried tangerine or mandarin orange peel (optional)

How to make:

  1. Gently place the eggs in a medium pot and fill with water to cover the eggs by 1-inch. Bring the pot to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer for 3 minutes.
  2. Remove the eggs ,leaving the water in the pot,  and let cool under running cool water.
  3. Using the back of the teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell all over. The more you tap, the more intricate the design. Do this with a delicate hand to keep the shell intact.
  4. To the same pot with the boiling water, return the eggs and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 40 minutes, cover with lid and let eggs steep for a few hours to overnight. The longer you steep, the more flavorful and deeply marbled the tea eggs will be.

And then you’ll crack these eggs open and you’ll have wonderful eggs – tea eggs to enjoy with tea. Aesthetically, at the very least, it would make a great breakfast. It just adds to the list of things you can do with tea – aging paper props for presentations or plays, cleaning carpets, acting as a compress, and with this dish as a way to make beautiful and amazing hard boiled eggs. Whether they’re made for Easter , Chinese New Year, or just a tuesday afternoon, they are egg-selent.

Tea-ception: Tea Made From Coffee?

Tea-ception: Tea Made From Coffee?

There is tea that is made from coffee. Now we haven’t been transported to an alternate universe, the space time continuum isn’t shattered,  Leonardo DiCaprio is not around and we are not in a Christopher Nolan film – this is real. It seems like the […]

L-Theanine and Caffeine: The Reason For Your Clari-Tea

L-Theanine and Caffeine: The Reason For Your Clari-Tea

Have you ever wondered why you get that perfect feeling when you’re drinking tea? That feeling that drives us to write and draw and talk and just dream? There is alertness and calmness and the feeling that in that moment , in the words of […]

Chrysanthemum’s The Word

Chrysanthemum’s The Word

With spring coming – yellow is definitely on the mind. Golden sunlight, highlights in your hair, shorts and cool cotton dresses, tall glasses of lemonade and, maybe the most important of all, yellow flowers. Tulips, daisies, buttercups and, in terms of tea Chrysanthemum. Golden sweet tea made from the sheer yellowness of Spring you so crave – and it has tons of health benefits.

Chrysanthemum tea acts as a natural coolant and has been talked about in  ancient Chinese medicinal science.  A person can benefit a lot by having Chrysanthemum tea every day. The Chinese medicinal practice included the use of herbs as a major part of the treatment.  It has high amounts of B carotene , which is converted in Vitamin A in the liver. This  is helpful in treating skin problems and increasing immunity. Vitamin A also helps in postponing the aging process and age related blindness. The  tea is also a good source of Vitamin Bs like choline, folacin, niacin as well as riboflavin. It also contains Vitamin C which reduces the risks of scurvy and protects eyesight.  Chrysanthemum tea also has minerals like calcium, iron , magnesium and potassium – all important for good health. .

Chrysanthemum tea  has been drunk  in the past  to decrease body heat and drink during meals to help digest food for years, however, recent scientific studies find out health benefits of loose chrysanthemum tea are far greater.  It is now known to clear head colds and alleviate sinusitis pains because of the  vitamin C content of the tea. This is also because it is  antiviral because of that is a reliever of head congestion caused by viral infections. Chrysanthemum tea naturally lacks caffeine which makes it resistant to caffeine-induced side effects such as anxiety, irritability and nervousness. It is also known for its stimulating properties and is  used to refresh the brain and alerting the senses. It energizes all the senses quickly and also calms them down to instill better and clear perception.In addition benefits of drinking chrysanthemum tea includes soothing sore throats and helping  cure red,itchy eyes.

So, pour a cup of the golden stuff. You can steep it with hot water for 3 to 4 minutes and then you’re ready to go. You’re ready to drink all the flowery, yellowy goodness that is Chrysanthemum tea and take the health benefits with it.

Study With A Cup Of Tea

Study With A Cup Of Tea

For all you students out there: whether you’re in midterm, just getting out of midterm, or just really stressed out – put down that cup of coffee and pick up a cup of tea. Tea boosts your brain and mental state in ways that jittery […]