Do You Want a Tea Cocktail Mar-tea-ni or a Bubble Tea with Mixology

bubble tea mixology

Tea is the new coffee! As more and more restaurants, cafes and hotels starting to sell more exotic teas, a few of them are now trying to get creative in order to offer something unique. Here are two very good examples:

Mar-tea-ni

Berkeley’s Asha Tea House (2086 University Ave.) has always been a place for people with different levels of tea appreciation, including teenagers craving sweet boba drinks and connoisseurs who spend hours steeping top-grade high-mountain oolong leaves in a traditional gaiwan. Now there’s something for the boozehounds among us, too: Since August, Asha has been serving a small selection of tea cocktails. The drinks, which are available after 5:30 p.m., offer convincing evidence that tea and alcohol do, in fact, mix — better than you might imagine. Read more
tea cocktail

Bubble Tea with Mixology

The Frozen Old Fashioned bubble tea cocktail at MoPho tastes just like a standard version of the classic drink, but with daiquiri-like texture of blended ice and the squishy presence of tapioca pearls or gummy blobs of flavored jellies sucked through a fat straw. “I don’t think you can get any more fun and lighthearted than a boba tea,” said Jeff Gulotta, co-owner and manager of MoPho. (Gulotta, like many, prefers the more traditional word “boba” over the more popular “bubble” in describing the Southeast Asian drink. Read more

Given these two examples it seems that the possibilities are endless. Have you have tried to make a cool tea drink before at home? Perhaps you should try out making this bubble tea and add some additional creativity to it. Feel free to share.

How To Easily Make Bubble Tea At Home

While bubble tea has been very popular among teenagers in Asian countries. This is proven by the fact that even a bubble tea museum was opened last year in Taiwan. But that’s not it, bubble tea is now also making its way in Western countries with the world’s largest Bubble tea being created in Los Angeles created last year. Though it looks complicated to make, it’s actually really easy and much cheaper than buying it bubble tea store!

how to make bubble tea

1. Buy Dry Tapioca Pearls

Tapioca pearls can usually be purchased at any Asian/Chinese supermarket. Make sure it’s ‘Tapioca Starch’ (not potato) as they taste better! What you will be surprised how cheap they are and you will start wondering why bubble tea stores sells it for premium prices.

2. Dissolve Sugar in Hot Water

Because bubble tea is a cold drink, sugar doesn’t dissolve in it. That’s why you have to dissolve the sugar in hot water first. For one cup of bubbles, you need to use one cup of water and half a cup of sugar.
sugar water bubble tea

3. Boil The Pearls

For 1 cup of dried bubbles (good for several drinks), use 6 cups of water. Keep stirring until they float to the surface. Afterwards, turn the heat lower and cook the bubbles covered for about 20 minutes. Make sure to stir every 5 minutes. At last, turn of the heat and wait for 25 minutes before the bubbles are ready.

4. Rinse The Bubbles!

Rinse the bubbles/pearls like this:
rinse bubble tea

5. Soak The Bubbles In Syrup

Soak the pearls in the syrup you created in step 2 for 15 minutes.

5. Be Creative & Mix

Now it’s all up to you. The original bubble tea is a mix of pearls, black tea and milk. But you are free to choose other types of tea such as oolong tea or green tea a well. Besides, that be creative with other ingredients! Try it at home and share with us your creations!

Plans to Make the Largest Cup of Boba Tea

Plans to Make the Largest Cup of Boba Tea

Boba Tea or bubble tea, sometimes known as pearl milk tea, is a Taiwanese tea-based drink invented in tea shops in Taichung, Taiwan, during the 1980s. Most bubble tea recipes contain a tea base mixed with fruit or milk. Ice-blended versions are usually mixed with fruit or syrup, resulting in a slushy consistency. Most bubble teas come with small chewy tapioca balls ,  commonly called “pearls” or “boba”.  There are many variants of the drinks, and many kinds of types are used and ingredients added. The most popular bubble drinks are bubble milk tea with tapioca and bubble milk green tea with tapioca.

Los Angeles business 626 Night Market is planning to embark on a brand new feat: to create the largest boba cup in the world. They’ve already started a Kickstarter campaign for the cause. Their goal is to raise the money needed for a plexiglass cup that is expected to hold 320 gallons of tea. The cup in question will be six feet tall and situated on a 2.5 feet high platform. The straw will extend its height an additional 3.5 feet resulting in a grand total height of 12 feet. The expected cost of the venture will be $9,000.

This boba tea will hold  320 gallons of tea — over 2,500 cups of a standard 16 oz. boba drink — and will weigh approximately 2,700 lbs., heavier than an average sedan. According to the organizers, people will actually be able to drink from the cup. They’re planning on giving out 250 cups of boba tea away. Whether or not the drink will be a boba green tea or milk tea is still up in the air. A manufacturer from China has already been contacted and the night market is still in the process of collaborating with local boba shops to help brew the gigantic concoction.

This is quite a venture and when the day arrives, an exciting day to drink from that momentous tea. In the meantime, you can make a boba tea on your own with this recipe via the kitchn:

(but significantly smaller)

How to Make Boba and Bubble Tea

What You Need

Ingredients

1/4 cup dried boba tapioca pearls per serving (NOT quick-cooking boba)
1-2 tea bags per serving, any kind
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
Milk, almond milk, or sweetened condensed milk
Fruit juice or nectar (optional)

Equipment

Saucepan
Bowl for holding the cooked boba
Measuring cups

Instructions

1. Cook the Boba: Measure 2 cups of water for every 1/4 cup of boba being prepared into a saucepan. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Add the boba and stir gently until they begin floating to the top of the water.

Turn the heat to medium and cook the boba for 12-15 minutes. Remove the pan from heat, cover, and let the pearls sit for another 12-15 minutes.

2. Prepare Sugar Syrup for the Boba: While the boba are cooking, make a simple sugar syrup to sweeten and preserve them once cooked. Bring 1/2 cup of water to a boil over high heat on the stove or in the microwave. Remove from heat and stir in 1/2 cup sugar until dissolved. Set aside to cool.

3. Prepare a Strong Cup of Tea: This can be done either while the boba are cooking or ahead of time. Allow enough time for the tea to cool completely before making the boba. Bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Remove from heat and add the tea bag. Use one tea bag for regular-strength bubble tea or two for a stronger tea flavor. Remove the tea bag after 15 minutes and chill the tea.

4. Finish the Boba: Once the boba have finished cooking, drain them from the water and transfer them to a small bowl or container. Pour the sugar syrup over top until the boba are submerged. Let sit until the boba are room temperature, at least 15 minutes, or refrigerate until ready to use. Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

5. Make the Bubble Tea: Pour the prepared tea into a tall glass and add the boba. Add milk for a creamy bubble tea, juice for a fruity tea, or leave plain and add a little extra water. Sweeten to taste with the simple syrup from soaking the boba.

Additional Notes:

• Very Chilled Bubble Tea: For an extra-chilly bubble tea, combine all the tea, milk, and/or juice, but not the boba in a cocktail shaker. Add a few ice cubes and shake for 20 seconds. Pour into a tall glass and add the boba.

• Shortcut Boba: If you want immediate gratification, just cook your boba until they are tender, 5 to 10 minutes, and use them as soon as they’re cool. This kind of boba don’t keep for very long (turning rock hard in a few hours), but are delicious if eaten right away.

• Saving Leftover Boba and Making Boba for Later: Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated with simple syrup for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

Bubble Tea is Here to Stay

Bubble Tea is Here to Stay

There’s been a lot of news about chemical maleic anhydride in starch used to make bubble tea in Taiwan in terms of fears that the tapioca pearls may be toxic. The pearls have been recalled and there has been some debate on what will happen to bubble tea. Officials assure though, that bubble tea is here to stay.

President Ma Ying-jeou has pledged that Taiwan will explain the incident to the international community and take  action. This includes fast-tracking legislative review of amendments to Taiwan’s food sanitation act, as well as strengthening food-safety monitoring. Taiwan’s Department of Health has identified more than 20 firms involved in the cases of bad starch and destroyed 312 tons of products. The country’s local governments have been instructed to enforce stricter market inspections, while all relevant agencies will cooperate to prevent unauthorized additives from entering the food market. The public has been encouraged to participate in this national campaign by reporting any wrongdoing. The government has also demanded that exporters provide necessary documentation to prevent contaminated products from leaving the country.Lastly, vendors and retailers of foods containing modified starch are now required to post safety certificates in order to reinforce food inspection in the future.

There is definitely movement that bubble tea will be safe again and that people will be drinking it as usual. With these new policies in place Taiwan will be able to provide that delicious beverage and know it will be safe too.

Bubble Tea Museum In Taichung

Bubble Tea Museum Could Open in Taichung

A  bubble tea museum  could open in Taichung, Taiwan by the end of this year to promote both tea culture and local tourism. The Chun Shui Tang Cultural Tea House, which is a locally renowned bubble tea maker, said it hopes the museum will better introduce to tourists the quintessential Taiwan-originating tea, complete with its black tapioca balls at the bottom of the cup.

As Angela Liu, the tea house manager says,

“We could take the opportunity to promote Taiwanese bubble tea to foreign tourists,”

She said the museum is likely to provide information on the tea, along with courses that will allow visitors to hand-shake their own beverages. The idea of offering hands-on experiences came from a successful program the tea house is already running, which it developed with the Tourism Bureau about two years ago amid Taiwan’s bid to diversify its travel services through offering more in-depth travel options.

This is very interesting news – to have both a bubble tea museum and a program that could help teach those interested to make the tea themselves. As popular as bubble tea has been in recent years, if this museum goes through, it is sure to be a hot spot for tea.

Make Your Own Bubble Tea

Who doesn’t love bubble tea? The sweet cool beverage is hard to pass up walking through the asian supermarket or bubble tea stalls. Well with this recipe, you can make it at home. This recipe details  how to make both the tea and “bubbles”, or Boba.

How to Make Boba and Bubble Tea

What You Need

Ingredients

1/4 cup dried boba tapioca pearls per serving (NOT quick-cooking boba)
1-2 tea bags per serving, any kind
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
Milk, almond milk, or sweetened condensed milk
Fruit juice or nectar (optional)

Equipment

Saucepan
Bowl for holding the cooked boba
Measuring cups

Instructions

1. Cook the Boba: Measure 2 cups of water for every 1/4 cup of boba being prepared into a saucepan. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Add the boba and stir gently until they begin floating to the top of the water.

Turn the heat to medium and cook the boba for 12-15 minutes. Remove the pan from heat, cover, and let the pearls sit for another 12-15 minutes.

2. Prepare Sugar Syrup for the Boba: While the boba are cooking, make a simple sugar syrup to sweeten and preserve them once cooked. Bring 1/2 cup of water to a boil over high heat on the stove or in the microwave. Remove from heat and stir in 1/2 cup sugar until dissolved. Set aside to cool.

3. Prepare a Strong Cup of Tea: This can be done either while the boba are cooking or ahead of time. Allow enough time for the tea to cool completely before making the boba. Bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Remove from heat and add the tea bag. Use one tea bag for regular-strength bubble tea or two for a stronger tea flavor. Remove the tea bag after 15 minutes and chill the tea.

4. Finish the Boba: Once the boba have finished cooking, drain them from the water and transfer them to a small bowl or container. Pour the sugar syrup over top until the boba are submerged. Let sit until the boba are room temperature, at least 15 minutes, or refrigerate until ready to use. Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.

5. Make the Bubble Tea: Pour the prepared tea into a tall glass and add the boba. Add milk for a creamy bubble tea, juice for a fruity tea, or leave plain and add a little extra water. Sweeten to taste with the simple syrup from soaking the boba.

Additional Notes:

• Very Chilled Bubble Tea: For an extra-chilly bubble tea, combine all the tea, milk, and/or juice, but not the boba in a cocktail shaker. Add a few ice cubes and shake for 20 seconds. Pour into a tall glass and add the boba.

• Shortcut Boba: If you want immediate gratification, just cook your boba until they are tender, 5 to 10 minutes, and use them as soon as they’re cool. This kind of boba don’t keep for very long (turning rock hard in a few hours), but are delicious if eaten right away.

• Saving Leftover Boba and Making Boba for Later: Boba are best if used within a few hours of cooking, but will keep refrigerated with simple syrup for several days. The boba will gradually harden and become crunchy as they sit.