Tea & Arthritis

Arthritis is a common terms that describes joint pain. While it’s often understood as a disease it can be rather seen as a symptom resulting from different causes.

For some people, arthritis could be caused by inflammation. In such a case, tea can be a easy and effective natural remedy.

What is Inflammation?

When visiting the Wikipedia page you’ll read that inflammation is described as:

A part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants, and is a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators.

Scientific research on mice until now concludes with pretty strong evidence that feeding mice with polyphenol rich tea reduces inflammation and thus joint pain. Does this work on humans? Well let’s believe it for now, until more conclusive research follows.

Before we head on to what tea is the most suitable, let’s have a look at the definition of tea as well.

What is Tea?

When we talk about tea, we’re referring to leaf tea made from the Camellia Sinensis tea plant. Given this, herbal teas made from other plants, such as Rooibos, doesn’t fall in this category. They’re officially referred to as tisanes. This of course doesn’t mean they don’t help against inflammation. In fact, some tisanes are very effective!

What’s the Best Leaf Tea against Inflammation and Arthritis?

Now you understand that inflammation is a cause of arthritis, we can now discuss some teas that can be effective against that.

When it comes to leaf tea, there’s green, white, black, oolong, and pu erh tea. They’re all from the same tea plant as I said before. What makes them different is the processing method applied. White and green tea are the least processed of all, while oolong, black and pu erh are more processed teas.

Types & potential side effects

Generally research shows that white and green tea contain the most polyphenols, so it would make sense to suggest those teas to prevent arthritis. However, white and green teas can have their side effects, and some people are very sensitive to that. Because they’re less processed teas, they tend to be ‘raw’. And this rawness can sometimes hurt the stomach. When you suffer from Arthritis, go for a cup of white and green tea first, but check if your stomach can handle the regular consumption of 4-5 cups a day. The best is to drink it after meals and snacks when you’re stomach isn’t empty.

If you do suffer from side effects on the stomach, then switch to oolong, black or pu erh tea. For the latter, there are two types: Sheng (raw) and Shou (ripe) pu erh. We won’t go into the details of explaining the difference here, but go for ripe pu erh.

Some oolong teas can still be harsh on the stomach, such as a lightly oxidized Tie Guan Yin, while a darker Dahongpao oolong is fine. Black teas are usually ok as well, and with ripe pu erh it can hardly go wrong. Ripe pu erhs are post-fermented and actually very soft on the stomach. It even supports digestion.

At the end of the day, there’s not that much difference between the polyphenol levels among the types. Don’t worry to much about the type of tea that you should consume as long as it’s tasty, so you’ll be able to make it part of your daily diet.

Herbal Teas against inflammation

Besides leaf teas there are also great herbal teas against inflammation. You’ve to be careful with those as they can be very powerful. So try them in small amounts first. In China, Kuding tea and Honeysuckle tea are the most famous examples and often prescribed by Chinese Medicine doctors.

Read this article in which we’ve published a honeysuckle tea with rose buds recipe: https://helloteacup.com/2016/05/13/rose-tea-recipes/

Other Notes on Arthritis

  • Avoid drinking tea in the evening as it contains caffeine.
  • Try to listen to your body, tea often helps, but not for everyone. Consult a doctor when in doubt.
  • Try to adjust your tea choice across seasons. Often times, people tend to go for a more refreshing green tea during summers and a more soothing black tea during Winters. There’s nothing wrong with that intuition.
  • Don’t just drink tea for health, try to enjoy it. Isn’t that also a health benefit in itself?!

 

2 Chinese Dried Rose Tea Recipes: Low Calories & Lots of Benefits

Rose flower tea is delicious and has lots of benefits such as supporting your digestion, improving the skin, and helping you to de-stress after a busy working day. As it’s caffeine free and near zero in calories, it’s suitable for any time of the day. See the video below showing how you can easily prepare a rose flower tea at home/office with a Teasenz infusion tea mug. This video will be followed by two bonus rose tea recipe ideas!

Honeysuckle Rose Tea Recipe To Fight Flu

One amazing rose tea recipe is one that combines the dried roses with honeysuckle. A great recipe to enjoy the health benefits of roses with the anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties of Honeysuckle. And did you know it’s great as a natural remedy against a flu or cold as well?

What you’ll need:

  • 2 gram dried honeysuckle
  • 5 pieces rose buds
  • Water temperature: 90 degrees Celsius
  • Steeping time: 5-8 minutes
  • Water amount:
    • 120 ml hot water in gaiwan – good for 3 brews; or
    • 500 ml hot water in teapot – good for 1 brew.

Note: avoid honeysuckle during pregnancy.

Myosotis Rose Tea Recipe for Even Better Skin

One other popular Chinese rose tea recipe is one that combines dried rose buds with Myosotis flowers. These purple flowers are often used in cosmetics as they’re amazing for a soft and smooth skin. In addition, it adds a more nutty flavor to the pure rose tea. Try this recipe as soon as you can and stay young forever..

What you’ll need:

  • 2 gram Myosotis
  • 3-6 pieces of Rose buds
  • Water temperature: 90 degrees Celsius
  • Steeping time: 12 minutes
  • Water amount:
    • 120 ml hot water in gaiwan – good for 3 brews; or
    • 500 ml hot water in teapot – good for 1 brew.

Other Flowers: Lavender?

Now that you know that rose tea can be blended with Myosotis and Honeysuckle, you might wonder whether it works with other flowers as well. The answer is: yes, probably. One flower that’s for sure great with roses is lavender. The aroma of lavender is strong, so try to find a balance in proportion for the blend. We suggest to start wit about 80% roses and 20% lavender. If you’ve any other rose tea recipe ideas, feel free to share them in the comment section!

Add Leaf Tea: Rose Green Tea Recipe?

Adding leaf teas to the rose flowers definitely is another way to be creative. Because the aroma of roses is delicate, we suggest to experiment with green teas, as they’re lighter in flavor. Moreover, the green color of the fresh leaves will look amazing with red or pink roses.

Make Iced Rose Tea

Besides making hot teas as shown in the video above, you could serve the teas ice-cold.  Either put the hot teas in the fridge (after they reach room temperature) or add lots of ice to let it cool down instantly. Great to stay fresh and hydrated during hot summer days. And if you can, bring some to the beach.

Honeysuckle Tea & Pregnancy

Due to a recent publication regarding honeysuckle tea’s effect against flu, we have received many emails from customers asking us whether honeysuckle tea can be consumed during pregnancy. For this blog post we have consulted different Chinese medicine doctors to make sure we give a responsible answer.

What Chinese Medicine Doctors Say

Here’s a few answers we got:

Answer 1: Honeysuckle, can be consumed during pregnancy, but do not drink too much. Focus more  on drinking lots of water and avoid spicy food.

Answer 2: It depends on your health condition. In general, honeysuckle tea can be consumed during pregnancy. However, when it causes diarrhea you should stop immediately.

Answer 3: Avoid drinking honeysuckle tea in the early stages of pregnancy. Honeysuckle tea has a cooling effect on the body.

Answer 4: After the 3rd month of pregnancy, honeysuckle tea is safe to drink.

Answer 5: It’s safe to drink, but due to it’s cooling effect, I don’t recommend it as it will not have the health benefits that you are looking for during pregnancy.

Conclusions & Guideline Regarding Honeysuckle Tea & Pregnancy

As you can see from the answers above, they are all very different, but we can make the following conclusions based on this:

  1. Avoid drinking honeysuckle tea in the early stage of pregnancy (1-3months)
  2. If you decide to consume, then don’t drink too much. Limit to a cup a day.
  3. If it causes stomach issues, stop consumption directly.

Honeysuckle Iced Tea Recipe

honeysuckle iced tea

With the health benefits of honeysuckle tea in the international spotlight, we would like the share a wonderful recipe. The cool thing about this recipe is that fresh flowers are used, while in China this herbal tea is made after the honeysuckle flowers are dried.

With Easter and Passover behind us, spring is really and truly here.  The honeysuckle vine draped across my front porch is in bloom, and  every time I go in or out I’m blown away by the scent.  I’ve been determined to use those incredible – edible  flowers somehow.  I’m always inspired by ingredients I can find  in my own yard, (or my neighbor’s!)  Over the last three years we’ve moved so often that I’ve tried to reduce the sting by challenging myself to find the elements in each new landscape that I can incorporate into my cooking.    I tried to make you a honeysuckle ice cream, but I’m going to have to keep working on that one, the flavor just didn’t come through.   Honeysuckle tea is more mainstream, in fact its been used medicinally by the Chinese for thousands of years.   I love it for its delicate scent, and the nectar is sweeter than honey.  I was amazed by how much flavor I got out of a jarful of  flowers.  If you have access to a vine, you’ve got to try this.

Honeysuckle tea is made with the delicate white and yellow flowers of the Chinese Honeysuckle vine.  It’s considered an invasive species, so gardeners and conservationists don’t like it, but it is pretty common, so chances are there’s a vine or two near you.  The flowers come in pairs, and you’ll want to pluck them right at their base, where the nectar is.  Look for freshly opened flowers, and avoid or pick out the leaves, stems, and berries.

Pour scalding water over the blossoms

The tea is made by pouring scalding water over the blossoms, and letting it cool at room temperature.

Let it chill in the refrigerator

Then you can chill your infusion in the refrigerator.

Filter the tea

I left mine overnight before straining it through a coffee filter or tea filter.

Customize and decorate!

The finished tea has a lovely pale celadon color, a light floral scent, and a surprisingly sweet flavor. Pour over ice, and add a sprig of mint. Whatever you do, though, don’t add honey before tasting your tea — it’s incredibly sweet all by itself.  You might want a squeeze of lemon if you don’t like sweet tea.

iced honeysuckle tea

With the winter coming you might not be super interested in iced tea, but it can never hurt to stock up as it’s going to be useful when you are facing a cold or flu!

The recipe is from the Theviewfromgreatisland.com

Honeysuckle Tea Act As ‘Virological Penicillin” Against Flu

chinese honeysuckle

Honeysuckle tea has been consumed in China for centuries for it’s effects against flu. Recently scientist from Nanjing university has confirmed through research this is not only a tradition.

The Telegraph reports that:

Trials showed that it could be effective against several variants of flu which have caused major public health scares in recent years, including H1N1 “Spanish Flu” and H5N1 avian flu.

The team from Nanjing University found that after drinking a “soup” of honeysuckle, mice absorbed a molecule from the plant known as MIR 2911 into their bloodstream and lung tissue.

The molecule was shown to suppress various types of flu virus by blocking two genes which are used by the influenza virus to replicate itself.

With the benefits of honeysuckle confirmed, which Chinese herbal tea will be next?

Honeysuckle Tea

When it comes to Honeysuckle herbal tea, the list of health benefits is long, but the main benefit is that it can fight inflammation which is the of many health challenges such as Acne. See the video and learn how easily it can be steeped with a teapot infuser.

Honeysuckle is slightly bitter with a fresh aftertaste that lasts for minutes in your mouth.

Prescribe Some Tea

Prescribe some tea

A good cup of tea can make a lot of things better. When you’re having a really bad day, when you’re so stressed out you feel as if the world is going to crush you, or even if you don’t feel anything at all – tea can fix you. Tea can do more than help you emotionally though. If you just prescribe some tea for yourself you can alleviate constipation, toothaches, heat stroke and much more.

Here are some tea mixtures to try from Screwtips . When unspecified, most of these blends use Green Tea.

  • Mix 7 grams of tea with approximately 10 small slices of ginger. This helps with the common cold, congestion, the flu or a chest cough.
  • Mix 3 grams of tea with vinegar to help with a stomach ache, toothaches, IBS or diarrhea.
  • Mix 3 grams of tea with a dollop of honey to help ease constipation, clear and comfort the lungs and also to help flush out the kidneys.
  • Tea porridge is  a common cure for upset stomachs and to aid with digestion. One recipe calls for 100 grams of white rice and 6 grams of tea. You should use wet tea leaves and grind/mix them in with rice for best results. You can add wet tea leaves to any starchy compound to achieve similar results.
  • Tea with chrysanthemum blossoms is one of the most common afternoon drink in Sichuan. It helps to ease “heat in the body” and removes toxins as well. It also helpshumidity and dizziness. Many people serve this drink chilled and in China they add several different types of medicinal herbs, including goji berries.
  • You can infuse your tea with a bit of ginseng to cure nervousness and to strengthen your constitution. It is a  good morning elixir or even just before you go to bed.
  • Black tea works very well with sugar and milk- it is very good for digestion.
  • You can add ground up orange peels to your black tea if you have an abscess in your throat or if you want to prevent one.
  • Green tea with honeysuckle  helps with heat stroke, hair follicle pyosis and enteritis.

If you just prescribe some tea, this is a great way to stay healthy and make yourself healthy. This doesn’t mean stop going to the doctor but it is definitely a great quicky cure and a way to make less trips to the doctor. It is always important to ask your doctor before deciding to make prescribing tea part of your everyday diet.

So, go ahead prescribe some tea for those aches and pains, that digestion or as per usual – just to make yourself feel really good.

Honeysuckle Tea

As we are starting March and as the grips of Winter seem to be loosening every day – one can’t help but think of Summer. Sunlight streaming through windows, golden heat sinking into our skin and lazy days. The idea of it – putting on summer dresses and laying in the grass, picking honey suckles and getting that little drop honey inside. The faint smell of them fills everything, carried on the cool breeze, in the fiber of our clothes – it even seems imbued into that  golden light touching everything.

Honeysuckle tea  is not only delicious but has numerous health benefits. According to teabenefits.com, Honeysuckle tea can alleviate sores and swelling of eyes and throat, can help with headaches, and is said to inhibit the bacteria that causes salmonella, strep, staph, and tuberculosis infections. So have a little taste of summer and keep yourself healthy with Honeysuckle tea. As the adage says – you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Well, hopefully not flies, but maybe better health.