All things Chinese tea, food and culture.

Tag: tea india

Purple Tea, Coffee Leaf Tea, Alcoholic Tea & More

Purple Tea, Coffee Leaf Tea, Alcoholic Tea & More

Lots of things are happening around the world when it comes to tea. Here’s a summary of all the news that you have to know about from this week. Purple Tea? Nelson Kibara has been growing tea in the Kerugoya region for 40 years. He […]

Where In The World Is That Tea From?

Where In The World Is That Tea From?

Tea is not just something nice to drink, but an international commodity. Have you ever wondered where that tea in your tea cup came from? Tea was first grown and cultivated  in China. Before long, it spread to Japan and then was transplanted far and […]

The Business of Tea

The Business of Tea

Tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world next to water, and can be found in almost all U.S. households. It is the only beverage that is commonly served hot or iced, anytime, anywhere,  and for any occasion. On any given day, over 160 million Americans can be found drinking tea. In 2011 Americans consumed over 65 billion servings of tea or over 3 million gallons. About    85 % was black tea, 14% was green tea, and the remaining amount was white tea and oolong tea. 2011 marked the second consecutive year that the US imported more tea than the UK.  Approximately 85% of tea consumed in the US is iced. The tea  industry anticipates strong, continuous growth over the next five years. And that is only in the US, there are tea drinkers all over the world.

Much of the world’s tea is grown 3,000 – 7,000 feet above sea level, between the tropic of capricorn  and the tropic of cancer, where there is mineral rich soil. The top five exporters of tea are Kenya, Sri Lanka, China, India, and Vietnam. China’s tea exports decreased last year, by 2.8 percent.   The output reached 1.75 million tons , with 3,10,000 tonnes shipped overseas.  China’s tea exports have reached more than 120 countries and regions worldwide. Because the value of Tea exports increased last year so did the price, which ultimately had an effect on the exports. Yang Shengjun, Vice-President of the China Chamber of Commerce of Foodstuffs and Native Produce, says that China will work to nurture major tea producers and boost their ability to innovate.

Tea, no matter where you are, is important both with how much you shell out for that tin or cardboard box and how much the global market is paying. Tea is green in more ways than one.